Incredible Products From Black-Owned Businesses

Buying products from black-owned businesses is one of the small things we can do to right the inequities in the market. Lunation advocates voting with our dollar, but good design and values are a must. We put together a list of black-owned businesses with phenomenal designs, ideas, and products.

While we put together specific products from these companies, they’re all grounded in strong values with a wide selection of products worth exploring.

1. Clare Paint

If you’re looking to use this pandemic as an opportunity for some home improvement, this company is a fantastic choice for sourcing your paint. It was created by Nicole Gibbons, an interior designer who was frustrated the current paint landscape.

Clare Paint

Clare is the cool paint company. They have a gorgeous pallet of colors that you sort through with their Clare Color Genius™ quiz. They’re also changing the way you test colors, with adhesive swatches you can stick on your wall, avoiding the footprint and mess of a small batch of actual paint. As for the quality itself, it’s 100% acrylic for a durable finish, and meets high standards of environmental and toxicity practices.

2. Lucy and Yak Dungarees

Lucy and Yak is a UK-based company with a super cute collection of youthful clothes. We chose a set of unisex dungarees, as it’s one of their main product categories, with a wide product selection of slightly different cuts and textures. I felt this cargo set was cool because it has more actual utility, with some extra pockets, belt loops, and a clip for cuffing the legs.

Lucy and Yak Unisex Dungarees

Lucy and Yak are known for making ethical dungarees that don’t break the bank, and don’t compromise on ethics. This pair of cargo dungarees adds a few pockets and features to their classic set, making it an ideal work set of light work clothes.

3. Bole Road Throw Blanket

A throw is one of those home goods items that warms up a space on many levels. Filling your home with soft items deadens sound. It’s a visual element of design. And when the temp is right, you can actually use it. This company has a ton of great textiles grown, spun, and loomed by artisans in Ethiopia. They make their way back to Brooklyn, where the textiles are finished into products like this. Their slightly higher prices fund fair wages for these highly skilled artisans. I love how they have this throw styled on the wood bench with some of their pillows.

Bole Road Onyx Throw

This throw from Bolé Road is a butter-soft, luxurious piece to accompany any sitting area. All their products are handwoven in Ethiopian by artisans earning a hair wage. Made from 100% Ethiopian Cotton. Colored with 100% natural dyes.

4. Cedar + Vanilla Candle

If you’re going to candle it up, you only need a few things. Good smell. Good presentation. That’s why it’s great that 228 Grant Street Candle Co. checks those boxes while making them naturally in the U.S.

Cedar + Vanilla Candle

228 Grant Street Candle Co. makes clean, simple candles. They’re only made of all-natural soy wax, braided cotton wicks, and scented oils, in a stylish amber jar. No additives. While they have a ton of scents, I chose Cedar + Vanilla, my perfect combination of sweet and smoky.

5. Lazy Oaf Quarter Zip

My whole life I was never really into polos. Maybe call it getting bored with t-shirts, but I got a few that I’ve fallen in love with. This piece from street wear company Lazy Oaf is all that, with a relaxed fit and quarter-zip to take it to the next level.  The company runs a small publication called Oafworld, which features a lot of great articles about lifestyle and fashion.

Lazy Oaf Quarter Zip Polo

This is a black and white polo shirt with a relaxed fit, black collar, and quarter zip. They have a list of super specific practices explaining how they live up to their high values of ethics and sustainability, with a unique emphasis on mental health. This piece is 100% cotton.

Protest Amazon

We did not link to any Amazon listings due to their ongoing sales of facial recognition software to law enforcement. AI researchers and the ACLU have demonstrated how this software is disproportionately inaccurate for darker-skinned faces and women, beyond the obvious privacy and justice concerns.
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